Mid-America Port Commission


Mid-America Intermodal Port District

 

 
    Welcome to Our Website

On behalf of the Mid-America Port Commission, and the Mid-America Intermodal Authority Port District, we are indeed pleased to welcome you to our website.  The website will introduce you the makeup of the Mid-America Port Commission her nine Commissioners; as well as the Mid-America Intermodal Authority Port District and her seven Directors.  These volunteers oversee the development of inland intermodal transport terminal with foreign trade zone and sub-zones.

Background

Recognizing the unique capacity of the river system and the challenge of retaining a dwindling population by creating meaningful jobs in the region of NW Illinois, SE Iowa and NE Missouri; the three states of Illinois, Iowa and Missouri formed the Mid-America Port Commission.  In this document you will find employment graphs that show the decline in jobs in the Commission and District areas.  The graph does not reflect the loss of 550 jobs from Methode Electronics, Inc. in Golden and Carthage, Illinois just announced that will occur in 2008.  The Commission was established as a regional economic development entity to create a modern regional intermodal port and attached terminal area.  Illinois also created the Mid-America Intermodal Authority Port District as a state of Illinois entity engaged in the same worthy enterprise.  Note that the Commission States share administrative costs only.  Capital infrastructure spending is administered by Districts within each of the three states.  Upon the creation of the Commission, the three states funded a feasibility study prepared By the Rock Island District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (hereinafter referred as the “Corps of Engineers”) that studied the local economic environment, evaluated potential sites and made recommendations.  As quoted in the study, Commissioner Timothy E. Hoschek states that the goal of the Port Commission is to:

 “…better use the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers to promote area economic development, save business and industries shipping costs, spur national and international trade, and create jobs[1]

 The study recommends the “Mid-America Port Commission pursue… the riverport industrial park/public terminal development option, or … a combined riverport manufacturing and distribution center.[2]    “In all, 28 potential sites were identified from the nearly 700 miles of examined shoreline, unweighted criteria were applied, and the potential sites were ranked by state.  Several suitable sites were found for development in each state.[3]  The potential sites are shown on the graphic found on page 17, at the beginning of the “Detailed Background Information” section of this Master Plan.

 The Port Market Analysis and Site Selection Study further recommends “… that a public general commodities terminal combined with a large industrial park with Foreign Trade Zone status (a riverport) would best meet the region’s needs…[4]  As import trade increases to the Mid-America Regional PortTM, establishment of a General Purpose Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) will be pursued.  Until that time, the District has an agreement in place with FTZ-114 from Peoria, Illinois, to administer sub-zones in our region until a General Purpose FTZ can be established.

 After carefully considering the recommendations of the study, the Port Commission chose the Curtis Creek Federal area, a location on the Illinois side in Pool 21, above and near Lock and Dam 21.  After developing a detailed site plan for the Curtis Creek area, and conducting numerous coordination meetings with the City of Quincy, Illinois, the Corps of Engineers, and other interested organizations, the Corps of Engineers had continuing “safety of navigation” concerns.  The safety of navigation issue was primarily due to interference with down-bound barge and tow traffic approaching Lock and Dam 21.  These navigation concerns could not be mitigated or overcome with the location initially chosen, and the decision to make Curtis Creek area the initial site for the Mid-America Regional PortTM was abandoned in mid-2005. 

 During the meetings where the safety of navigation concerns were discussed, the Corps of Engineers suggested investigating sites below Lock and Dam 21 for suitability.  Ward Island, which is in the study area but had not been previously evaluated, was selected for evaluation in the fall of 2005.  Ward Island is located approximately one river mile below Lock and Dam 21 at river mile 324, near the terminus of Radio Road in the South Quincy Levee District.  The site is judged as ideal for the Mid-America Regional PortTM and attached industrial park.  The Industrial Park is protected by a 500 year levee, and the site is near potential industrial customers.  In late 2005 the Commission made Ward Island area the primary site for initial development.  After successful establishment of the primary site at Ward Island, other satellite sites in each member state will be established as the port flourishes.

Benefits of the Mid-America Regional PortTM

The benefits for Phase One of the port’s development are significant.  As quoted in the analysis done by the Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs

 “...the economic benefits associated with development at the Mid-America Regional PortTM will extend far beyond Adams County and the state of Illinois.  The benefits will be experienced across a large portion of the tri-state region.  The intermodal facilities will provide Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri firms access to national and international markets.  New and expanded manufacturing operations will bring opportunities to the region by adding value to agricultural commodities heretofore shipped to processing facilities outside the region.  The resulting jobs and wealth generated will raise and maintain quality of life for residents throughout tri-state region.  Lastly, local and county governments in the area will realize significant annual gains in public revenues through stronger property tax base and increased sales taxes.”[5]

 

 

Industrial output

Full & part-time positions

Employment compensation

State and local tax revenues

MARPTM

Phase 1

$94,290,410

136

$11,621,000

$2,811,000

[6]

“Business development associated with anticipated activity in MARPTM’s Phase One will result in an annual increase of almost $95 million in economic activity in Adams County.  The majority of the increase, $67.6 million, will stem from the activity at the port facilities, while another $27.3 million will be secondary effects from indirect business linkages and increased household spending.  The increased economic activity will generate 467 full-time and part-time positions.  As projected, MARPTM’s Phase One will have an employment multiplier of 2.7.   That is, each job directly associated with the activities at the port will generate an additional 1.7 positions in the county.  Employment compensation multiplier is also 2.7.  More than $5.1 million of the $11.6 million annual gain in payroll will be realized by employees of businesses indirectly linked to business activities at the port.  Another $2.1 million in annualized payroll will be linked to increased household spending by employees of direct and indirect business operations.”[7]

 

Anticipated Phase One business development and related economic activities will result in state, county, and local governments generating approximately $2.8 million in annual revenues.   This amount includes an increase of $1.08 million from commercial, industrial, and residential property taxes.  In addition, county and local sales tax revenues would be expected to increase by approximately $145,000 per year.”[8]

 


[1] Burlington, Iowa, Hawkeye, June 6, 2000 as quoted in Tennessee Valley Authority, Port Market Analysis and Site Selection Study, Rock Island District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, December 2001, p9-6

[3] Tennessee Valley Authority, Port Market Analysis and Site Selection Study, Rock Island District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, December 2001, pv

[4] Tennessee Valley Authority, Port Market Analysis and Site Selection Study, Rock Island District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, December 2001, pv

[5] Rural Economic technical Assistance Center, Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs, Western Illinois University, Mid-America Regional PortTM, An Analysis of Potential Economic Impacts, December 2006, p3

[6] Rural Economic technical Assistance Center, Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs, Western Illinois University, Mid-America Regional PortTM, An Analysis of Potential Economic Impacts, December 2006, p2

[7] Rural Economic technical Assistance Center, Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs, Western Illinois University, Mid-America Regional PortTM, An Analysis of Potential Economic Impacts, December 2006, p7

[8] Rural Economic technical Assistance Center, Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs, Western Illinois University, Mid-America Regional PortTM, An Analysis of Potential Economic Impacts, December 2006, p7

Hopefully, you will find that there is a lot of pertinent information on the website.  You can click on hyperlinks which will direct you to more information on specific topics.  For example, click on the following hyperlinks to get information on transportation comparisons of tonnage, pollution and fuel economy.  If you have any comments or suggestions, please contact us at maiaport@adams.net or 217.222.3111.

Thank you for your interest.

back to home page

welcome letter

meet our staff

meet our Commissioners

meet our Directors

statement of purpose

jurisdiction

foreign trade zones

Permits Required in Illinois

presentation part I

presentation part II

presentation part III

presentation part IV

email